An Inspirational Money Story To Help With Your Goals This Year

In our New Year’s podcast, we talked about how this time of year is a great time to start to figure out your New Year’s goals and resolutions. In the financial sense, it can be a huge move, because time is on your side, especially if you have large purchases coming up, that you know you can set aside a certain amount for, like semi-annual car insurance payments, etc.

Marianne Hayes, writing for Acorns, highlighted 3 people who were able to aggressively knock some of their personal finance goals in 2018. Hopefully this can give you some inspiration for 2019!

Check out how Alexandra Tran, 34, a marketing strategist from Seattle was able to save $22,000 through couponing, credit card rewards and side gigs:

“One of my 2018 New Year's resolutions was to significantly up my savings rate. I already had good money habits, like funding my Individual Retirement Account (IRA) and other long-term savings and keeping my expenses low. (My mortgage is just 14 percent of my income, for example.) But I’ve got my eye on early retirement in about 10 years, so I really wanted to challenge myself. So I set an intention to sock away about a quarter of my $80,000 salary—and ended the year with $22,000 more in savings.

I started with some easy wins, like shopping less and limiting myself to one of everything (i.e., one black jacket instead of two styles). I also scaled back entertainment spending—skipping the movie theatre in favor of Netflix and volunteering at special events (which cost as much as $300 a head!) to gain free entry. These moves didn’t add up to much regular savings, but they got me in the mindset to consider how every dollar counted toward my goal.

Next, I looked for simple ways to maximize everyday financial moves. For example, I took advantage of my bank’s offer of $200 for moving some cash into a money market account. And I got strategic with credit card rewards and coupons.

I have a few cards that offer 2 to 5 percent cash back on rotating categories (like groceries and gas), and I charge everything—from transportation costs to utilities, food, pet supplies and even my mortgage. I use an app called Debitize, which automatically earmarks cash from my checking account to cover my credit card purchases. This way, I don’t accidentally overspend or revolve credit card debt.

I also scour weekly supermarket specials and time necessary shopping around big sales at outlet malls. Stacking coupons on top of in-store discounts—and paying with cash-back cards—has gotten me up to 80 percent off before. Overall, I’ve whittled down my $150 weekly grocery bill to about $40.

My most effective move, by far, was finding ways to earn more. I recently began renting out my guest room to students for $700 per month—easy, passive income. I’ve also downsized my belongings by as much as 60 percent. As a former impulse shopper, I had a lot of nice clothes and home goods that I wouldn’t miss, so I sold them on sites like Poshmark and Mercari, raking in thousands (and the lion’s share of my savings for the year).

Offloading unwanted stuff online may not be a sustainable savings trick, but it took the pressure off needing to find more ways to cut back and helped me leapfrog toward my big savings goal. There’s a psychological benefit, too: Letting go of material things that don’t serve me in favor of a bigger savings balance actually felt great.”

Make sure to check out the other stories too.